Cold This Month Poetry: ‘Be “Absolutely” For…

 

(for M.L., why not…)

 
Before I see you again
I will think of the way you consider your words with me
I will consider the smiles that you have held onto
and returned to your breast as though you needed back the breath

I will see you coming thru every door and down every hallway
always a surprise worthy of reliving
worth the price of the aloneness that follows

your arrival
and going away again
slipping thru sudden moments
creating and creasing your way into my hope: a Christmas unto yourself

I will begin each one of my next sentences with a loud laugh
I will start them over again and again

for each time that
I imagine you will smile
even with your face and beating heart so fully turned into worship

before I see you again
before you enter   and sway    and send forth your glow
before there is a shivering thought and smile of my own over you
before I can remember that other women walk the Earth
before the Sun warms your skin
before it spreads your smile
before it slits your eyes into that pencil-thin gaze that you’ve perfected
before …
before …be-absolutely-for
being adored …

go ahead and know that I’m always
looking
wanting
waiting
until it happens again

 

Jas. Mardis /12-16
Jas. Mardis is a 2014 Inductee of the Texas Literary Hall of Fame and Editor of “KenteCloth: Southwest Voices of the African Diaspora, UNT PRESS

Tapestry: Haint-Free Blue Door Formula

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I imagined that the idea for enslaved folks to paint the doors ocean blue was passed around as people were moved around the Southern States during enslavement. Blue doors are said to ward off evil spirits.

The narrative on this piece imagines the formula and when to apply it being handed down by a new person from a different region and being repeated and applied.

15×45 image development, yard, thread, leather and printed text with thread accents. Original Narrative text by Jas. C. Mardis

Photo Credit: Title: Old Negro (former slave) Willis Winn with horn with which slaves were called. Near Marshall, Texas Creator(s): Lee Russell, 1903-1986, photographer, U.S. Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black & White Photographs

Summer Remembrance: The Negro Traveler Green Book

“Negro Traveler’s Green Book” piece for a Juneteenth show. This one is more of a tribute than artistic endeavor. I used burlap on one corner to house the Jim Crow signage and subliminally speak to transitioning from Country-to-City life. These are family and found photos. The narrative is my original piece and not an actual slogan used in the publication.

Do you remember this necessary travel guide? It was published 1936-1967 for the whole Country and abroad.

I’m available to show and/exhibit any one of three fabric art series. Leave me a comment with your interest.

 

First Place Award…

I’ve won a First Place Award at the Ft Worth juried art exhibition for Juneteenth! More in a minute! Tarrant County Community College South Campus is located at 820 & 3501 Campus Dr in Fort Worth, TX.  This is a juried art exhibition celebrating freedoms gained on Juneteenth and the abolition of enslavement. My fabric Art piece celebrates the freedom to serve in the Military. Charles Young was the 3rd Black Graduate of West Point’s Military Academy, the First African-American to earn Colonel and the first African-American Superintendent of Public Lands. He was born into slavery so I titled my piece “To Whom much is Given…”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

March Exhibit Alert

It is already a great start to 2019 with fabric art placements already in January, February March and April. This marks my March exhibition participation and I’m grateful to Dr. Carolyn L. Mazloomi for choosing my piece, “To Whom Much is Given, Much is Required”.

Exhibition opening March 16, 2019 at the National Afro-American Museum in Wilberforce, OH. Book available on Amazon and in book stores early March.