Tag Archives: Dallas

Final Natl-Poetry-Month Poem: How Sweet It Is… (audio and text)

Audio: How Sweet It Is

How Sweet It Is…

I want to sing
not just that hand moving vocalizing from American Idol tryouts
but sing in a way that makes men    wait to go pee

when the alarm has gone off   and it’s me on the radio
and the morning is still cold on the other side of his woman
and she is barely making a sound
but her mouth is a smile
and her hips are exposed from beneath and around her gown

and I’m chiming something from The Originals

and I don’t even care that it’s four-part harmony
’cause damn    he’s looking over across her curves and sweetness
and remembering a few nights ago   that should have been last night, too

and she’s curling her shoulders into the full light of day  breaking across into the room

and her leg straightens   and the gown   just gives up

and there is something rising in the air on the sun’s rays and in the mist of dust
and there are all kinds of “yes” in the way that she opens her eyes to him

and the covers and pillows    fall into line

and there is nothing to be said with words
not even that line about “gonna be late for work”
because I’m on the radio

and what they HEAR when I sing: “DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR”
is “I’ve been missing you since yesterday night”

and what they FEEL when I sing: “WHEN YOUR LIPS ARE KISSING MINE”
is, “Yeah”

and what they KNOW when I sing: “DO YOU HEAR THE BELLS, DARLING”
is, “All I need is five minutes to show you”

and what they DO when I sing: “DO YOU HEAR THE BELLS RINGING IN YOUR EARS, BABY”
is ask, “Can we turn that up a little bit, then?”

…”OH, I’LL NEVER HEAR THE BELLS….OH, I’LL NEVER HEAR THE BELLS…
NO, I’LL NEVER HER THE BELLS WITHOUT….YOU, BABY”

How sweet it must be    to sing

Jas. Mardis (04/2015)
National Poetry Month 2015

**Click here to see The Originals sing their hit song properly

Jas. Mardis is a 2014 Inductee to The Texas Literary Hall of Fame, Multiple National Association of Black Journalist GRIOT Awards for Radio Commentary and  a Pushcart Prize Winner for Poetry. He is Editor of KenteCloth: Southwest Voices of the African Diaspora (UNT Press). For booking information of poetry or The Family Story Project workshops–j.mardis@verizon.net or just send a reply from this page.

Welcome

mardis pensive look

Jas. Mardis is a long term resident of Dallas,Texas. He is an awarded Poet, Radio Commentator and Storyteller with current projects that include anthology editing, quilting, radio and print commentary and coordinating workshops at The Family Story Project.

Jas. Mardis has three previously published chapbooks of poetry that are being re-released in the Fall of 2015 under a single title, “That Boy, There“. These titles were released during the 1990’s as, “Southern Tongue”, “Hanging Time” and  “The Ticking and the Time Going Past”. These book titles are out of print but are available with an online search thru various independent book sellers who purchased inventory from book stores that have since closed their brick and mortar stores or simply gone out of business. These original books range in value from, the original $5 cost-to- upwards of $90 and one seller’s asking price going above $100. This is back stock and historic, original printing, so be guided as your desire and wallet will allow.

Jas. Mardis is the Editor of “KenteCloth: Southwest Voices of the African Diaspora”, 1999 UNT Press.

This is the first anthology to cover the writing of African-Americans from across the Southwest: Texas, New Mexico, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Louisiana. It holds significance as it is pre-Hurricane Katrina and documents a core of New Orleans contributors, along with the works of emerging and established writers, such as Tim Seibles (2014 National Book Award Finalist), Ms. Bernestine Singley (When Race Becomes Real),  Kalamu ya Salaam, Rev. Jesse Truvillion, Mr. Lindsay Patterson (Langston’s Hughes last Secretary), Clifton Taulbert, Pearl Garrett Clayton and Sharon Bridgeforth (The Bull-Jean Stories), among others. There are 42 contributors in the anthology and many of them were new voices, such as Ms. Singley, at the printing.

Jas. Mardis received The Pushcart Prize for Poetry for his contribution, “Invisible Man”, to the anthology.

Jas. Mardis has also been award The GRIOT Award from The National Association of Black Journalist-Dallas Chapter for Radio Commentary heard on National Public Radio station, KERA 90.1 FM in 1994, 1995 and 1996.

He was also a finalist during that same time for the KATIE Award from The Dallas Press in the same category.

Other publications and awards can be viewed on the WRITER page of this site.

Jas. Mardis is the Coordinator of The Family Story Project, a for profit family history workshop program that assist individuals and families in discovering their family narrative thru the stories that have been told thru time.

More information on The Family Story Project Workshops can be found on the FSP page of this site.